Feast of the Confession of Saint Peter 1/18/2021

Greetings in the Name of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ:

Today, January 18, 2021 is when the Christian Church celebrates the Feast of the Confession of Saint Peter.  The Church remembers that Saint Peter spoke for all disciples of Jesus when he confesses “You are the Christ” and that this confession is the bedrock of the Christian Church, which Christ Himself builds.  This post is devoted to one of the Feast Days that the historic Christian Church regularly observed that are generally neglected today.  I pray that you find this message beneficial in your devotions this or another day.

“The Confession of Saint Peter did not arise in the imagination of Peter’s heart but was revealed to him by the Father.  The reason this confession is important is seen in Jesus’ response: ‘You are Peter [Greek, Petros], and on this rock [Greek, petra] I will build My church (Matthew 16:18).’  As the people of God in the Old Testament began with the person of Abraham, the rock from which God’s people were hewn (Isaiah 51:1-2), so the people of God in the New Testament would begin with the person Peter, whose confession is the rock on which Christ would build His Church.  But Peter was not alone (the ‘keys’ given to him in Matthew 16:19 were given to all the disciples in Matthew 18:18 and John 20:21-23).  As Saint Paul tells us, Peter and the other apostles take their place with the prophets as the foundation of the Church, with Christ Himself as the cornerstone (Ephesians 2:20).  The confession of Peter, therefore, is the witness of the entire apostolic band and is foundational in the building of Christ’s Church.  Thus the Church gives thanks to God for Saint Peter and the other apostles who have instructed Christ’s Holy Church in His divine and saving truth.” 1

The verse or theme for this feast is “Alleluia.  Whoever would save his life will lose it, but whoever loses his life for My sake and the gospel’s will save it.  Alleluia.”  It is from Mark 8:35.

First Reading       Acts 4:8-13

Psalm                   Psalm 118:19-29 (antiphon v. 26)

Epistle                  2 Peter 1:1-15

Gospel                  Mark 8:27–9:1

The hymn appointed for this day is “At the Name of Jesus” as found on page 512 in the Lutheran Service Book.  You may listen and sing along with the hymn at this direct link: Hymn 512 At the Name of Jesus – YouTube

Collect of the Day:

Heavenly Father, You revealed to the apostle Peter the blessed truth that Your Son Jesus is the Christ.  Strengthen us by the proclamation of this truth that we too may joyfully confess that there is salvation in no one else; through the same Jesus Christ, our Lord, who lives and reigns with the You and the Holy Spirit, one God, now and forever.  Amen.

Pastor Jim Tuell

Treasury of Daily Prayer, Scot A Kinnaman, General Editor, Concordia Publishing House, Saint Louis, MO., 2008, p, 1128.

Daily Lectionary: 1/18/2021

Click on the scripture references to start reading!

Ezekiel 40:1-4, 43:1-12

Optional Bonus Reading: Ezekiel 40:5–42:20, 43:13-27

Romans 8:18-39

The selections from Holy Scripture from one day to the next follow a semi-continuous course through entire books of the Bible.  This is consistent with the ancient Christian precedent and practice of lectio continua (“continuous reading”).  This approach allows Scripture to interpret itself in its own literary context.  Thereby it also informs and shapes Christian prayer and devotion over the course of time.  The semicontinuous reading of Holy Scripture does not mean that one must begin with Genesis and read straight through the Old Testament in order, nor with the Gospel of Matthew and read straight through the New Testament, though Christians in the history of the Church have done precisely that.  The semicontinuous reading pattern developed by the Daily Lectionary assigns the various books of the Bible according to the liturgical seasons of the Church Year.  By way of example, the prophet Isaiah and his many prophecies of the coming Christ is read during the Season of Advent, while the Acts of the Apostles is read during the post-Pentecost Time of the Church.  Thus the readings relate to the Church Year in a broad, general fashion, not in the more focused and specific way that one expects for the lessons and Holy Gospel appointed for particular Sundays and festivals of the Church Year.

—Kinnaman, Scot A., and Henry V. Gerike. Treasury of Daily Prayer. Concordia Pub. House, 2008.

Daily Lectionary: 1/17/2021

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Ezekiel 39:1-29

Romans 7:21–8:17

The selections from Holy Scripture from one day to the next follow a semi-continuous course through entire books of the Bible.  This is consistent with the ancient Christian precedent and practice of lectio continua (“continuous reading”).  This approach allows Scripture to interpret itself in its own literary context.  Thereby it also informs and shapes Christian prayer and devotion over the course of time.  The semicontinuous reading of Holy Scripture does not mean that one must begin with Genesis and read straight through the Old Testament in order, nor with the Gospel of Matthew and read straight through the New Testament, though Christians in the history of the Church have done precisely that.  The semicontinuous reading pattern developed by the Daily Lectionary assigns the various books of the Bible according to the liturgical seasons of the Church Year.  By way of example, the prophet Isaiah and his many prophecies of the coming Christ is read during the Season of Advent, while the Acts of the Apostles is read during the post-Pentecost Time of the Church.  Thus the readings relate to the Church Year in a broad, general fashion, not in the more focused and specific way that one expects for the lessons and Holy Gospel appointed for particular Sundays and festivals of the Church Year.

—Kinnaman, Scot A., and Henry V. Gerike. Treasury of Daily Prayer. Concordia Pub. House, 2008.

Daily Lectionary: 1/16/2021

Click on the scripture references to start reading!

Ezekiel 38:1-23

Romans 7:1-20

The selections from Holy Scripture from one day to the next follow a semi-continuous course through entire books of the Bible.  This is consistent with the ancient Christian precedent and practice of lectio continua (“continuous reading”).  This approach allows Scripture to interpret itself in its own literary context.  Thereby it also informs and shapes Christian prayer and devotion over the course of time.  The semicontinuous reading of Holy Scripture does not mean that one must begin with Genesis and read straight through the Old Testament in order, nor with the Gospel of Matthew and read straight through the New Testament, though Christians in the history of the Church have done precisely that.  The semicontinuous reading pattern developed by the Daily Lectionary assigns the various books of the Bible according to the liturgical seasons of the Church Year.  By way of example, the prophet Isaiah and his many prophecies of the coming Christ is read during the Season of Advent, while the Acts of the Apostles is read during the post-Pentecost Time of the Church.  Thus the readings relate to the Church Year in a broad, general fashion, not in the more focused and specific way that one expects for the lessons and Holy Gospel appointed for particular Sundays and festivals of the Church Year.

—Kinnaman, Scot A., and Henry V. Gerike. Treasury of Daily Prayer. Concordia Pub. House, 2008.

Daily Lectionary: 1/15/2021

Click on the scripture references to start reading!

Ezekiel 37:15-28

Romans 6:1-23

The selections from Holy Scripture from one day to the next follow a semi-continuous course through entire books of the Bible.  This is consistent with the ancient Christian precedent and practice of lectio continua (“continuous reading”).  This approach allows Scripture to interpret itself in its own literary context.  Thereby it also informs and shapes Christian prayer and devotion over the course of time.  The semicontinuous reading of Holy Scripture does not mean that one must begin with Genesis and read straight through the Old Testament in order, nor with the Gospel of Matthew and read straight through the New Testament, though Christians in the history of the Church have done precisely that.  The semicontinuous reading pattern developed by the Daily Lectionary assigns the various books of the Bible according to the liturgical seasons of the Church Year.  By way of example, the prophet Isaiah and his many prophecies of the coming Christ is read during the Season of Advent, while the Acts of the Apostles is read during the post-Pentecost Time of the Church.  Thus the readings relate to the Church Year in a broad, general fashion, not in the more focused and specific way that one expects for the lessons and Holy Gospel appointed for particular Sundays and festivals of the Church Year.

—Kinnaman, Scot A., and Henry V. Gerike. Treasury of Daily Prayer. Concordia Pub. House, 2008.

Daily Lectionary: 1/14/2021

Click on the scripture references to start reading!

Ezekiel 36:33–37:14

Romans 5:1-21

The selections from Holy Scripture from one day to the next follow a semi-continuous course through entire books of the Bible.  This is consistent with the ancient Christian precedent and practice of lectio continua (“continuous reading”).  This approach allows Scripture to interpret itself in its own literary context.  Thereby it also informs and shapes Christian prayer and devotion over the course of time.  The semicontinuous reading of Holy Scripture does not mean that one must begin with Genesis and read straight through the Old Testament in order, nor with the Gospel of Matthew and read straight through the New Testament, though Christians in the history of the Church have done precisely that.  The semicontinuous reading pattern developed by the Daily Lectionary assigns the various books of the Bible according to the liturgical seasons of the Church Year.  By way of example, the prophet Isaiah and his many prophecies of the coming Christ is read during the Season of Advent, while the Acts of the Apostles is read during the post-Pentecost Time of the Church.  Thus the readings relate to the Church Year in a broad, general fashion, not in the more focused and specific way that one expects for the lessons and Holy Gospel appointed for particular Sundays and festivals of the Church Year.

—Kinnaman, Scot A., and Henry V. Gerike. Treasury of Daily Prayer. Concordia Pub. House, 2008.

Daily Lectionary: 1/13/2021

Click on the scripture references to start reading!

Ezekiel 36:13-28

Romans 4:1-25

The selections from Holy Scripture from one day to the next follow a semi-continuous course through entire books of the Bible.  This is consistent with the ancient Christian precedent and practice of lectio continua (“continuous reading”).  This approach allows Scripture to interpret itself in its own literary context.  Thereby it also informs and shapes Christian prayer and devotion over the course of time.  The semicontinuous reading of Holy Scripture does not mean that one must begin with Genesis and read straight through the Old Testament in order, nor with the Gospel of Matthew and read straight through the New Testament, though Christians in the history of the Church have done precisely that.  The semicontinuous reading pattern developed by the Daily Lectionary assigns the various books of the Bible according to the liturgical seasons of the Church Year.  By way of example, the prophet Isaiah and his many prophecies of the coming Christ is read during the Season of Advent, while the Acts of the Apostles is read during the post-Pentecost Time of the Church.  Thus the readings relate to the Church Year in a broad, general fashion, not in the more focused and specific way that one expects for the lessons and Holy Gospel appointed for particular Sundays and festivals of the Church Year.

—Kinnaman, Scot A., and Henry V. Gerike. Treasury of Daily Prayer. Concordia Pub. House, 2008.

Daily Lectionary: 1/12/2021

Click on the scripture references to start reading!

Ezekiel 34:1-24

Romans 3:19-31

The selections from Holy Scripture from one day to the next follow a semi-continuous course through entire books of the Bible.  This is consistent with the ancient Christian precedent and practice of lectio continua (“continuous reading”).  This approach allows Scripture to interpret itself in its own literary context.  Thereby it also informs and shapes Christian prayer and devotion over the course of time.  The semicontinuous reading of Holy Scripture does not mean that one must begin with Genesis and read straight through the Old Testament in order, nor with the Gospel of Matthew and read straight through the New Testament, though Christians in the history of the Church have done precisely that.  The semicontinuous reading pattern developed by the Daily Lectionary assigns the various books of the Bible according to the liturgical seasons of the Church Year.  By way of example, the prophet Isaiah and his many prophecies of the coming Christ is read during the Season of Advent, while the Acts of the Apostles is read during the post-Pentecost Time of the Church.  Thus the readings relate to the Church Year in a broad, general fashion, not in the more focused and specific way that one expects for the lessons and Holy Gospel appointed for particular Sundays and festivals of the Church Year.

—Kinnaman, Scot A., and Henry V. Gerike. Treasury of Daily Prayer. Concordia Pub. House, 2008.

Daily Lectionary: 1/11/2021

Click on the scripture references to start reading!

Ezekiel 33:1-20

Romans 3:1-18

The selections from Holy Scripture from one day to the next follow a semi-continuous course through entire books of the Bible.  This is consistent with the ancient Christian precedent and practice of lectio continua (“continuous reading”).  This approach allows Scripture to interpret itself in its own literary context.  Thereby it also informs and shapes Christian prayer and devotion over the course of time.  The semicontinuous reading of Holy Scripture does not mean that one must begin with Genesis and read straight through the Old Testament in order, nor with the Gospel of Matthew and read straight through the New Testament, though Christians in the history of the Church have done precisely that.  The semicontinuous reading pattern developed by the Daily Lectionary assigns the various books of the Bible according to the liturgical seasons of the Church Year.  By way of example, the prophet Isaiah and his many prophecies of the coming Christ is read during the Season of Advent, while the Acts of the Apostles is read during the post-Pentecost Time of the Church.  Thus the readings relate to the Church Year in a broad, general fashion, not in the more focused and specific way that one expects for the lessons and Holy Gospel appointed for particular Sundays and festivals of the Church Year.

—Kinnaman, Scot A., and Henry V. Gerike. Treasury of Daily Prayer. Concordia Pub. House, 2008.

Daily Lectionary: 1/10/2021

Click on the scripture references to start reading!

Ezekiel 18:1-32

Optional Bonus Reading: Ezekiel 19:1–24:27

Romans 2:17-29

The selections from Holy Scripture from one day to the next follow a semi-continuous course through entire books of the Bible.  This is consistent with the ancient Christian precedent and practice of lectio continua (“continuous reading”).  This approach allows Scripture to interpret itself in its own literary context.  Thereby it also informs and shapes Christian prayer and devotion over the course of time.  The semicontinuous reading of Holy Scripture does not mean that one must begin with Genesis and read straight through the Old Testament in order, nor with the Gospel of Matthew and read straight through the New Testament, though Christians in the history of the Church have done precisely that.  The semicontinuous reading pattern developed by the Daily Lectionary assigns the various books of the Bible according to the liturgical seasons of the Church Year.  By way of example, the prophet Isaiah and his many prophecies of the coming Christ is read during the Season of Advent, while the Acts of the Apostles is read during the post-Pentecost Time of the Church.  Thus the readings relate to the Church Year in a broad, general fashion, not in the more focused and specific way that one expects for the lessons and Holy Gospel appointed for particular Sundays and festivals of the Church Year.

—Kinnaman, Scot A., and Henry V. Gerike. Treasury of Daily Prayer. Concordia Pub. House, 2008.